Tag Archive: mystery goo

Mar 15 2019

Operations Summary – Week of 3/11/19

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Mar 15 2019

Progeny Mk6 Block I Flight 10 Analysis

This mission was the third attempt to successfully return samples of mystery goo from space, after they were lost on re-entry and lost at sea during previous missions. This mission also followed the previous launch that suffered numerous delays thanks to weather interference from the Monolith. A heavy-duty A/C system has since been installed in the Monolith temple to chill the interior and make it think there is no heat energy to form a storm with. This was based on evidence gathered from weather data that the Monolith was not able to feed energy to the storm itself. The prevention worked and during preflight after the rocket was powered on no sever weather patterns developed throughout the course of launch readiness. This allowed the launch team to hold the countdown and wait for a better launch window later in the middle of the day to send the rocket up when the radiation belt is closest to the surface to allow the payload to spend more time in the high-radiation region.

The Flight

Launching on schedule at 3pm local time, the rocket made a nominal ascent into space. Changes to the AFCS were minor mainly to compensate for the new launch time and different payload instruments from the last flight. Some bugs were also fixed, including a rare serious one that on the last flight cut off rocket telemetry at launch. The rocket carried two separate payloads of mystery goo, one that would be exposed outside the radiation belt and another that would be exposed inside the belt. There was no room to include a radiation sensor so best estimates were used based on previous flights to determine about where the boundary of the belt would be at the time of the launch.

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Jan 22 2019

Progeny Mk6 Block I Flight 8 Analysis

After the failure of the previous mission, the payload canisters were redesigned and built to stronger specifications. In addition to being able to withstand greater pressures and heat, the doors of the containment units were able to indicate to Mission Control whether or not they were properly sealed. If indeed the failure of the payload was the cause of the re-entry breakup then this time we had everything covered to help ensure a successful mission. Unfortunately this second attempt was delayed over 5 months thanks mainly to the Monolith EM field. After an initial delay due to weather, we were finally able to launch last week. The mission was successful in proving the Mystery Goo units could now survive re-entry however the payload itself was not able to be recovered, ultimately causing this mission to be labeled another failure.

The Flight

It was a nominal ascent to space, the newly-refactored AFCS functioning perfectly as it staged the rocket out of the atmosphere. Once in space the lower Goo unit cycled open to expose the sample to normal levels of radiation in low space. Once past 350km and nearing the known lower edge of the radiation belt, the Goo units switched, with the top one now being exposed the entire duration in which the rocket was inside the belt. The payload reached an apokee of 507km, 12km higher than the previous flight, before plummeting back towards the atmosphere. Once out of the radiation belt the lower canister was once again exposed while the upper one sealed shut and indicated to Mission Control that it was in fact locked. At 90km the lower canister also indicated it had properly closed and locked.

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Sep 05 2018

Progeny Mk6 Block I Flight 7 Analysis

Ever since we began traveling to space we sent along scientific instruments to study the environment that exists outside our atmosphere. Much of these observations could be transmitted home as data during the flight, allowing for partial mission success if the rocket and any additional more detailed data stored on board could not be recovered afterwards. Sending living samples up into space however requires close examination of the samples after they have been returned to the surface which is why this most recent Progeny Mk6 Block I flight, after a series of successful recoveries, carried aloft our first living samples of micro-organisms known as “mystery goo“. Unfortunately, the rocket was not recovered successfully, leading to the first failed mission of the Progeny Mk6 series.

The Flight

While the original launch date was delayed due to a high-pressure region sitting over the area around KSC for a few days and baking the surface with temperatures topping 100°F, on the rescheduled launch day of 7/31 there were no issues leading up to an on-time launch at 19:24:00.02 local time. The ascent of the rocket was nominal through all three stages, ending up on a sub-orbital trajectory with an apokee of 495.451km.

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Jun 29 2018

Operations Summary – Week of 6/25/18

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Jun 27 2018

High-Altitude Science Survey 46

Hitching a ride on a temperature survey over Area PB-G4, more Mystery Goo heads up into the atmosphere for additional tests of its ability to go into a protective stasis

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Jun 22 2018

Operations Summary – Week of 6/18/18

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May 25 2018

Operations Summary – Week of 5/21/18

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