Tag Archive: Progenitor

May 17 2019

Operations Summary – Week of 5/13/19

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May 14 2019

Progeny Mk6 Block I Flight 11

One of the instruments that was developed to fly on a future Extremis probe is small enough to be a payload for the Mk6 and studies charged particles – perfect for a shot into the inner radiation belt to test it out

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Apr 26 2019

Operations Summary – Week of 4/22/19

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Apr 22 2019

Progenitor Program Begins Orbital Bid with the Progeny Mk7-A

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Under development for over a year (the Progeny Mk6 debuted in Feb 2018), the latest iteration in the Progeny line of rockets will aim to satisfy new goals for the program – being able to deploy 0.35-0.625m payloads to Low-Kerbin Orbit (70-250km). The Mk7 series will also test out several new technologies that will work their way up to our bigger rockets such as vectoring engines, reaction wheel stability control systems, fully-actuating guidance fins, payload fairings, inline & more compact/lighter batteries. While we had hoped the Mk7-A could reach orbit, its primary design purpose will be to test the new form factor of a 0.625m payload atop a 0.35m stack in the final stage.

Another design consideration for all the Mk7 rockets is to be compatible with the pad infrastructure put in place for Ascension rockets, including the engine collar and resource towers. This will save time and money as we will no longer need to switch out the engine collar for a dedicated launch base. An insert for the engine collar will cradle the lower-stage booster while three stabilizers will help hold the rocket steady once the upper umbilical tower swings away from the liquid fuel tank and will retract moments before booster ignition. The lower umbilical tower will not be used.

The ‘-A’ designation of the rocket signifies that there will be several iterations yet to come but all will be working to achieve the same goal stated earlier. The Progenitor team already recognizes that they will be needing a more powerful second stage solid and the lower solid may need to have a new core designed as it was meant for lighter payloads carried up on sub-orbital trajectories with earlier Mk5 & Mk6 rockets.

First launch of the Mk7-A could happen as early as June.

Apr 19 2019

Operations Summary – Week of 4/15/19

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Apr 12 2019

Operations Summary – Week of 4/8/19

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Apr 05 2019

Operations Summary – Week of 4/1/19

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Mar 15 2019

Operations Summary – Week of 3/11/19

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Mar 15 2019

Progeny Mk6 Block I Flight 10 Analysis

This mission was the third attempt to successfully return samples of mystery goo from space, after they were lost on re-entry and lost at sea during previous missions. This mission also followed the previous launch that suffered numerous delays thanks to weather interference from the Monolith. A heavy-duty A/C system has since been installed in the Monolith temple to chill the interior and make it think there is no heat energy to form a storm with. This was based on evidence gathered from weather data that the Monolith was not able to feed energy to the storm itself. The prevention worked and during preflight after the rocket was powered on no sever weather patterns developed throughout the course of launch readiness. This allowed the launch team to hold the countdown and wait for a better launch window later in the middle of the day to send the rocket up when the radiation belt is closest to the surface to allow the payload to spend more time in the high-radiation region.

The Flight

Launching on schedule at 3pm local time, the rocket made a nominal ascent into space. Changes to the AFCS were minor mainly to compensate for the new launch time and different payload instruments from the last flight. Some bugs were also fixed, including a rare serious one that on the last flight cut off rocket telemetry at launch. The rocket carried two separate payloads of mystery goo, one that would be exposed outside the radiation belt and another that would be exposed inside the belt. There was no room to include a radiation sensor so best estimates were used based on previous flights to determine about where the boundary of the belt would be at the time of the launch.

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Mar 12 2019

Progeny Mk6 Block I Flight 10

The third attempt to fly mystery goo through space and the inner radiation belt and recover the samples upon return. Also the first launch that will attempt to prevent the Monolith from producing severe weather

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